For Heart Event Survivors

Aspirin Therapy Benefits

Should you be on an aspirin regimen?

Aspirin, when taken regularly as directed by a doctor, can help prevent a recurrent heart attack or ischemic stroke, and can even increase your chances of survival from a heart attack. With all of these benefits, you may wonder: why not take aspirin every day? But aspirin therapy is not appropriate for everyone— so it’s important to talk to your doctor first.

How aspirin therapy can help prevent recurrent heart attacks and ischemic strokes

If a blood clot forms in an artery, it can prevent blood flow to your heart, causing a heart attack. Aspirin, when taken regularly as directed by a doctor, can help prevent recurrent heart attacks and ischemic strokes.

You may be a candidate for aspirin therapy if any of the following apply to you:

  • You have had a heart attack
  • You have had an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)
  • You have unstable or chronic stable angina pectoris
  • You've had revascularization procedures such as coronary artery bypass (CABG) or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PCTA)
  • Remember, aspirin is not appropriate for everyone so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

What are the drawbacks?

Aspirin can increase your risk of bleeding in the stomach, intestine and other gastrointestinal areas.

The chance of stomach bleeding is higher if:

  • You are age 60 or older
  • Have had stomach ulcers or bleeding problems
  • You are taking a blood thinning agent (anticoagulant) or steroid drug
  • You are taking other drugs containing prescription or non-prescription NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or others)
  • You have 3 or more alcoholic drinks every day while using this product
  • You take more aspirin, or for a longer time, than directed

The bottom line: talk to your doctor

If you are a candidate for aspirin therapy, your doctor will discuss the right dosage for you.

Remember, you should not start an aspirin regimen on your own. The only way to know if you’re a candidate for aspirin therapy is to ask your healthcare provider.

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